The Many Faces of Fiction

For those of us who have written multiple works of fiction – from flash fiction to short stories to novels – many have likely noticed the chameleon-like ability to transfer from one narrative to another.

Similar to an actor who can go from portraying a serial killer to a kind grandfather (sometimes in the same story), a writer often has to think from multiple perspectives. Whether within the same piece or across many projects, our work requires us to create entirely separate and oftentimes wildly unique personas.

For example, in one novel, I have written from the PoV of a doctor, a politician and a terrorist. Similarly, another of my novels follows just one narrative – that of a teenage girl living in post-WWI Greece. Further still, my horror short occurs through the perspective of a teenage boy from the midwestern United States.

So, now I want to hear about your positive experiences and challenges in creating unique PoV characters. Which narrative has been your favorite and why?

4 thoughts on “The Many Faces of Fiction

  1. I tend to write from multiple points of view giving the reader an insight to how all the main character’s see things. I find it fun to give perspective that doesn’t necessarily have importance to the story but instead how the people who live in my head (until i write them down) are looked at.

    In the novel I hope to have out later this year, I use a cat. In one of my short stories the protagonist reveals who he is through his actions. Getting into his head too early gives things away.

    I don’t do first person narratives in fiction…at least not yet.
    I

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for a lovely point of view, Sylvie! I am also currently working on my first attempt at first person PoV in a novel. An animal narrator sounds great, I’ve only ever written on flash fiction piece from a dog’s point of view. Writing a whole book that way sounds like an admirable challenge!

      Like

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